In ex-Soviet states, Russian spy tech still watches you

December 21, 2012

Categories: Articles, News and Announcements, Research News

A joint investigation by Agentura.Ru, CitizenLab and Privacy International was published in Wired Magazine, titled In ex-Soviet states, Russian spy tech still watches you, on 21 December, 2012. Below is an excerpt.

On November 12, the Russian Supreme Court okayed the wiretapping of an opposition activist. The Court ruled that spying on Maxim Petlin, a regional opposition leader in Yekaterinburg, was lawful, since he had taken part in rallies where calls against extending the powers of Russia’s security services were heard. The court decided that these were demands for “extremist actions” and approved surveillance carried out by the national interception system, known as SORM.

Manned by the country’s main security service, the FSB, this ”System of Operative Search Measures” has been in use for more than two decades. But recently, SORM has been upgraded. It is ingesting new types of data. It is being used as Moscow’s main tool for spying on the country’s political protesters. And it has become extremely useful in the quest to make sure that the Kremlin’s influence in the former Soviet Union continues long into the second regime of Vladimir Putin.

Read the full article.

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