Tag Archives: Kazakhstan

Kazakhstan sues Google, Twitter and Facebook

Source: RT

Google, Facebook, Twitter, and LiveJournal are among the defendants in a lawsuit filed by Kazakh prosecutors seeking to shutdown some opposition media outlets in the republic.

Uzbekistan: A peek inside an SCO anti-terrorism center

Source: Richard Weitz, EurasiaNet

Since its official opening in June 2004, the anti-terrorism center, or RATS, has fostered coordinated policies and joint action on potential terrorist threats in SCO member states.

Internet freedom in Asia forsens, say human rights groups

Source: James Kilner, Telegraph

The three Central Asian states have justified increasing censorship of the internet as necessary to combat the growing threat from Islamic militants who are using email and websites to find recruits and pass around information.

Trend Micro uncovers Lurid APT attacks on thousands of computers

Source: V3.co.uk

Trend Micro identified 47 victims of the successfully compromised 1,465 computers, including diplomatic missions, government ministries and space-related government agencies, according to Rik Ferguson, director of security research at the vendor.

Kazakhstan blocks “extremist” foreign Internet sites

Source: Reuters

A court in Kazakhstan ruled on Friday to block access to 13 foreign Internet sites, including the popular blogging service LiveJournal, saying they were propagating terrorism and inciting religious hatred. “These Internet resources … including LiveJournal … spread materials with propaganda of terrorism and religious extremism and open calls to committing acts of terror and making explosive devices,” Ailana Iskendirova, spokeswoman for the district court in the capital Astana, told Reuters by telephone.

Kazakh Bloggers Say Blockage Of Blog Website For ‘Political Reasons’

Source: RFE/RL

Some prominent Kazakh bloggers say the government’s blockage of the Wordpress blog platform since June is politically motivated, RFE/RL’s Kazakh Service reports.

In an official response to parliament deputy and active Wordpress user Murat Abenov, main Kazakh Internet provider KazTeleCom said on July 12 that it blocked domestic access to Wordpress because of two “illegal” blogs.

For full original article, see here

Changes to the Open Internet in Kazakhstan

The genius of the Internet has always been its open infrastructure, which allows anyone with a connection to communicate with anyone else on the network. It’s not limited by national boundaries, and it facilitates free expression, commerce and innovation in ways that we could never have imagined even 20 or 30 years ago.

Some governments, however, are attempting to create borders on the web without full consideration of the consequences their actions may have on their own citizens and the economy. Last month, the Kazakhstan Network Information Centre notified us of an order issued by the Ministry of Communications and Information in Kazakhstan that requires all .kz domain names, such as google.kz, to operate on physical servers within the borders of that country. This requirement means that Google would have to route all searches on google.kz to servers located inside Kazakhstan. (Currently, when users search on any of our domains, our systems automatically handle those requests the fastest way possible, regardless of national boundaries.)
For full original article, see here

Ahead Of Elections, Kazakhstan Blocks Websites

“It’s election season in Kazakhstan and the government isn’t risking an Arab-style revolt (a very unlikely prospect anyway). But to play it safe, in recent weeks the Kazakh authorities have increased web censorship in the Central Asian country.

Last week our bureau in Almaty noticed that some RFE/RL sites (including our Kazakh, Russian, and English-language sites) were not accessible for those who connect through the biggest ISPs — KazTeleCom and Nursat, which are closely associated with the state.”

From Radio Free Europe

No Twitter revolt for Central Asia’s closed regimes

“High fees, spying, and outright blockage — Central Asia’s regimes are not short of ways to control Internet blogs and social networks which have mobilised the recent protests in the Middle East.

Strategies vary across the former Soviet republics of the region, whose regimes are largely authoritarian and where voicing dissent online can result in persecution.

Rights watchdog Reporters Without Borders has named Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan among the 12 countries that are “enemies of the Internet,” along with North Korea.”

From PhysOrg.com