Tag Archives: Human Rights

Network surveillance devices discovered via Shodan

Source: Shawn Merdinger, Infosec Island

It’s no secret that Shodan has turned up some interesting findings over the past few years – everything from critical infrastructure devices, to VoIP phones, solar and wind farms, HVAC systems, even a online crematorium.

Syrian activist arrested for having livestreaming app installed phone

Source: Tech Dirt

Police and security forces around the world — and that includes in the West — hate being recorded when they’re overstepping the mark in the execution of their duties, since it allows the public to challenge official accounts, and even to use videos to seek redress.

British government admits it started controlling exports of Gamma International’s FinSpy

Source: Privacy International

Privacy International is delighted that the government has recognised the necessity of controlling exports of Gamma International’s technologies.

Use of social media to instigate communal tension worrying: PM

Source: Sudhi Ranjan Sen, NDTV

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh today raised alarm over the use of new tools – bulk SMS, social media, and internet – to stir an old problem – communal violence.

Apple patent could remotely disable protesters’ phone cameras

Source: Zack Whittaker, ZD Net

U.S. Patent No. 8,254,902, otherwise known as “Apparatus and methods for enforcement of policies upon a wireless device,” was granted in late-August, and would allow phone policies to be set to “chang[e] one or more functional or operational aspects of a wireless device [...] upon the occurrence of a certain event.”

Dear CPJ: Some malware from your ‘friend’

Source: Danny O’Brien, CPJ

We talk a lot about hacking attacks against individual journalists here, but what typifies an attempt to access a reporter’s computer?

Amnesty International site hacked by supporters of Syrian government

Source: James Ball, The Washington Post

Supporters of the Syrian government hacked the Web site of Amnesty International, posting items that falsely accused the rebels of a string of atrocities.

How the boy next door accidentally built a Syrian spy tool

Jean-Pierre Lesueur is in many ways a typical 22-year-old computer geek, but he’s also the man who built Dark Comet — which was recently used by the Syrian government to steal information from the computers of activists fighting to overthrow it.

Facebook apologises for deleting free speech group’s post on Syrian torture

Source: Josh Halliday, The Guardian

Facebook has apologised after it mistakenly deleted a free speech group’s post on human rights abuses in Syria.

UN Human Rights Council adopts landmark resolution on Internet freedom

Source: UN Human Rights Council

The UN Human Rights Council today adopted a landmark resolution presented by ‪Sweden‬ on protecting ‪Internet freedom.